About Roaring Brook Lake

Roaring Brook Lake is a man-made lake created in the 1940s when woodlands were flooded and a small dam built.  Since then a second, larger, dam was built behind the first dam in 1959-60.  The lake surface is 115 acres and the lake is a maximum of 16 feet deep with a mean depth of eight feet.  There are approximately 260 households in the Roaring Brook Lake District with many other undeveloped properties privately owned or owned by the Roaring Brook Lake District.  There are many events for residents (see Social Committee page and Calendar of Events) which foster a spirit of community.

Fishing, boating and swimming in the lake are permitted only for the residents of the Roaring Brook Lake District, their families and guests.  The Town of Putnam Valley issues parking stickers that must be affixed to any car in the parking areas.  Residents are issued beach tags that they and/or their guests should have on hand while using the beach. There are three beaches on the lake that are usually open from Memorial Day through Labor Day with lifeguards.

Gas operated watercraft are not allowed on the lake. Boats with electric motors are permitted, and all boats must be less than 16 feet in length.  Kayaks, canoes and sailboats are welcome.  Every boat must have on both sides of the front hull visible RBL District boat tags registered to the resident who owns it; and only residents’ boats are allowed on the lake.  This is vital for the health of the lake, to help insure no invasive weeds or aquatic life is introduced into the lake from the hulls of non-resident boats.  Several boat launch areas are maintained for RBL residents.  The lake is regularly stocked with fish, crayfish and frogs to enhance the fishing.  The lake contains healthy populations of large mouth bass, walleye pike, yellow perch, black crappie and many varieties of sunfish.

During the winter months, residents can skate, cross-country ski and ice fish on the lake.  ATV’s are not permitted on the lake.

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